Saturday, August 16, 2014

Mike Brown EyeWitness Crime Scene Video Ferguson, MO





How Microscopic Ocean Life May Help Make It Rain | Science | WIRED

How Microscopic Ocean Life May Help Make It Rain | Science | WIRED: "SAN FRANCISCO—Clouds can carry millions of pounds of water, but that doesn’t mean rain and snow just happen. Hundreds of thousands of water vapor molecules need to freeze together as ice before they are heavy enough to fall to the ground. But, the water molecules need a bit of dust or other microscopic matter to latch onto in order to get started, and some of the best bits for forming ice are pieces of once-living cells. Scientists now believe a lot of the organic matter in clouds is released into the air by breaking waves in the ocean."



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The Secret Bataclysm: White Nose Syndrome and Extinction | Science Blogs | WIRED

The Secret Bataclysm: White Nose Syndrome and Extinction | Science Blogs | WIRED: "In 2013, I got to participate in a bat census at the American Museum of Natural History’s Southwestern Research Station, a biological hotspot with more kinds of bats than anywhere else in the US.

I discovered fruit bats smell like a slice of fresh pineapple, and have delightful upturned noses speckled with pollen. Insect-eating bats…. smell a bit like a cat litter-box. But they are still fluffy and cute, like flying leathery hamsters.

Trying to convince people they should love bats (and that bats aren’t rodents) is not easy. When I recounted my amazing bat experience was to friends, inevitably they described their fear of bats and how best to kill said bats with blunt instruments. So, pretty much the same conversations I have with everyone about spiders."



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Migrating butterflies decide to stay and breed in Norfolk: Country diary 50 years ago | Environment | theguardian.com

Migrating butterflies decide to stay and breed in Norfolk: Country diary 50 years ago | Environment | theguardian.com: "Norfolk

At the end of May, red admiral butterflies arrived in Norfolk as migrants from the South. It seems that most of them stayed here to breed, because a great many gloriously fresh specimens are now appearing everywhere. In the last few days I have seen them in profusion on purple buddleias in gardens, on the rosy flowers of hemp agrimony in the marshes, and on sea rocket and sea lavender along the coast. They are more numerous than the peacocks and small tortoiseshells which are also enjoying an exceptionally good season with us."



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Saturday, August 9, 2014

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

A Little Piece of Me: A Smiling Face

A Little Piece of Me: A Smiling Face: I've never seen a smiling face that was not beautiful. ~Author Unknown He just looks like he's smiling, doesn't he?

Saturday, August 2, 2014